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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
's debate over right-to- work laws which would prevent labor unions from requiring membership. >> woodruff: paul solman explores the tax deductions that could be on the chopping block in the quest to bring down the deficit. >> we estimate $1.1 trillion a year in revenue the government gives up because of all the tax breaks. that's enough to solve the revenue problem but it's not going to happen. >> ifill: ray suarez has a newsmaker interview with secretary of homeland security janet napolitano. >> you can discuss border security and immigration reform simultaneously now. we don't have to this kind of first this and then that. at this point they actually go together. >> woodruff: special correspondent rick karr reports on the polluted waters that spilled into new york homes and businesses in superstorm sandy, raising health concerns. >> everybody sort of got sick at the same time. all of us sort of attributed it to, well, we're all stressed out. it's very cold. but that said, there is a lot of nasty stuff hanging about. >> ifill: and hari sreenivasan has an update on the dangerous working c
with the organized labor movement, michigan, has approved legislation vastly limiting the power of unions in the state. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on the passage of the right to work laws and the angry demonstrations inside and outside the state capital building. >> woodruff: then, we turn to protests in another part of the world, egypt, where supporters and opponents of president morsi staged rival rallies in cairo four days ahead of vote on a proposed constitution. >> suarez: next in our series of conversations about solving the fiscal crisis, gwen ifill talks with representative allyson schwartz, a democrat from pennsylvania. >> woodruff: we examine an almost $2 billion government settlement with british bank hsbc over charges of money laundering for the nation of iran and mexican drug cartels. >> suarez: jeffrey brown profiles chinese artist and dissident ai wei wei, whose work is on exhibit in the u.s. for the first time. >> if we can change ourselves, that means part of society will change. if more peopl
for the department? >> well, what this agreement involves is an agreement between the police union, the city and professors attorneys who filed this original civil rights lawsuit. what they've decided on is creating a compliance director. now, this would be a quasi mayor of oakland in a sense in that he gets to -- he or she would have the power to fire the police chief with the court approval. they would have the power to direct the city administrators. those are two things currently only the mayor has. it's limited in scope in that it would only effect the reform tasks that are incomplete for the police department. the city had been very concerned that this potential receiver, or federal receiver, would have oversight over the entire police department. so all -- so all three sides involved in this are very happy. >> and this whole situation stems from the riders case. remind us, again, what that was. that was a police brutality case. >> yeah. there were some officers who were accused of framing suspects and in the wake of that, there was millions of dollars paid out in civil lawsuits, but a
swarmed the state capital as lawmakers passed a bill prohibiting unions from requiring employees to join and pay dues. the move would make michigan, one of the most union-friendly states, the 24th "right to work" state, where union dues are voluntary. >> tom: more bumpy skies for boeing's 787 dreamliner. boeing's much anticipated and high-profile plane was grounded last week, according to "the new york times." the federal aviation administration also has ordered that fuel line connectors on all 787s be inspected. analysts call these problems minor hiccups. but as sylvia hall reports, the dreamliner's profitability to boeing right now is raising bigger concerns. >> reporter: boeing's 787 dreamliner promises to use about 20% less fuel than other planes. that's a big deal for an airline industry struggling with fuel costs. so far, boeing's sold more than 800 of its dreamliners, but the project has been plagued with three years of costly production delays. the company is ramping up production on the planes, but some analysts don't expect the company to see a profit from the line until at lea
in any state in the union. >> bills to change the law to make it harder for american citizens to vote, those were alec bills. bills to dramatically change the rights of americans who were killed or injured by corporations, those were alec bills. bills to make it harder for unions to do their work were alec bills. bills to basically block climate change agreements, those were alec bills. when i looked at them, i was really shocked. i didn't know how incredibly extensive and deep and far-reaching this effort to rework our laws was. >> she and her team began to plow through alec documents, as well as public sources, to compile a list of the organizations and people who were or had been alec members. they found hundreds of corporations, from coca-cola and koch industries to exxon mobil, pfizer, and wal-mart, dozens of right-wing think tanks and foundations, two dozen corporate law firms and lobbying firms, and some thousand state legislators, a few of them democrats, the majority of them republican. >> alec is a corporate dating service for lonely legislators and corporate special interes
was in michigan today, campaigning on his plan to avert the fiscal cliff. speaking to union workers at the daimler detroit diesel engine plant, the president said he is willing to compromise "a little bit" with republicans on getting a plan for economic growth, job creation, and reducing the deficit. but he said he would not compromise on raising tax rates for high-income earners. >> and that's a principle i won't compromise on because i'm not going to have a situation where the wealthiest among us, including folks like me, get to keep all our tax breaks, and then we're asking students to pay higher student loans, or suddenly, a school doesn't have school books because the school district couldn't afford it. >> susie: meanwhile, a ranking democrat on the house budget committee tells "nightly business report" he is optimistic about getting a fiscal cliff deal by the end of they year. maryland congressman chris van hollen talked with our darren gersh, and began with an update on the status of the talks. >> well, the good news is that the president and the speaker of the house are now in face-to-face
unions opposed the move, and last week, senator bernie sanders and several of his colleagues called on chairman genachowski to hold off. bernie sanders is an outspoken opponent of media consolidation. he sees it as a threat to democracy. once the mayor of burlington, vermont, he served 16 years in the house of representatives and was recently re-elected to his second term in the senate. he's the longest serving independent in the history of congress. he was in new york earlier this week and we met for this interview. welcome. good to see you again. >> good to be with you, bill. >> this is a strong letter, inspired one of your colleagues in the senate says, by you. what's the beef? >> what the chairmanf the fcc is now talking about is making a bad situation much worse by loosening up the cross-ownwnersp rules, which means now that a media giant, one of the big companies, whether it's murdoch's news corp. or anyone else, will be able to own major television stations, a newspaper, and radio stations within a given community. and that means people are jujus not going to be hearing diffe
of los angeles and long beach, california reopened today after port operators and the worker's union reached an agreement late tuesday. the union said it won new protections against job outsourcing. port officials said during the walkout, they were unable to move some $760 million worth of cargo a day. wall street had a day of ups and downs and investors watched economic reports and weighed chances for a fiscal cliff deal in washington. the dow jones industrial average gained more than 82 points to close at 13,034. but the nasdaq fell nearly 23 points to close at 2,973. the day's big loser was apple, down more than 6% over concerns that smart phone sales are lagging. former texas congressman jack brooks has died. he served 42 years in the house, and was in the dallas motorcade on november 22nd, 1963 when president kennedy was assassinated. hours later, brooks was on hand as vice president and fellow texan lyndon johnson was sworn in to the presidency. later, brooks helped author the 1964 civil rights act, and he drafted the articles of impeachment against president nixon. jack brooks
crippled after clerical workers went on strike and were supported by the longshoreman's union, which refused to cross the picket line. the shutdown cost $1 billion a day. the work stoppage also forced ships to reroute to ports in mexico, panama and northern california. a tentative deal was reached late last night after federal mediators joined negotiations. no details yet on the deal, but workers are expected to get new terms that will prevent jobs from being outsourced. >> tom: we saw the influence of apple on any stock index which includes it. without apple, the dow rallied. but the nasdaq and s&p 500 were weighed down thanks to apple's weakness. the s&p 500 hit its lowest level of the session just after a stronger than expected report on the services sector before 11:00 a.m. eastern time. it bounced into positive territory and closed up 0.2%. volume picked up a little on the big board with 757 million shares. 1.8 billion moved on the nasdaq. the technology sector was the big drag on the broad market. it fell 1.3%. the utility sector saw the best gains, up 1.6%. apple put the brake
their constitutions to bar gay unions. here with us to explain today's development, and where it could lead, is marcia coyle of "the national law journal." welcome back, marcia. >> thanks, marg wet. >> warner: so is it fair to say first of all that the court's decision to hear these first two cases in itself a momentous decision? >> absolutely. a number of gay rights organizations, particularly as if relates to the federal defense of marriage act have been working towards that point. and yes, whatever the court says, if it reaches the merits of these cases will be extremely important. >> warner: let's take them one by one, prop 8 in california first. remind us briefly of how what started out as a state issue ended am in the supreme court. >> the california supreme court a number of year its ago ruled that same sex marriages were constitutional under its state constitution. voters disagreed by passing proposition 8 in 2008 banning those marriages. proposition 8 was challenged by gay and lesbian couples who were represented by former opponents ted olson and david buoyes. it ultimately reached the federa
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)

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